© Pedro Menezes
© Pedro Menezes
© Câmara Municipal do Porto Santo
© Neide Paixão
© Câmara Municipal do Porto Santo
© Élvio Sousa
© Susana Fontinha
© Élvio Sousa
© Francisco Fernandes
© António Aguiar
© Susana Fontinha
© Élvio Sousa
© Pedro Menezes
© Filipe Viveiros
© Élvio Sousa
© Pedro Menezes

Crocheted Walls, "Salão" Houses and Archaeological Marine Sites

 

CROCHETED WALLS 

Associated to the vineyard cultures, they were built by fitting stones of different sizes and functions. At the base, they were larger and served as support to other, smaller stones which were piled up leaving some spaces, in order to provide good ventilation and ideal temperature conditions.

 

Crocheted Walls © Pedro Menezes

 

‘SALÃO’ HOUSES 

A local clay called ‘salão’ was used to cover the rural houses and that is why they are called “casas de salão” (salão houses). The ‘salão’ protected the houses from strong winds, giving them a cool environment in the summer and making them waterproof in the periods of rain. They were one storey houses with pavilion or gabled roofs and included three rooms: the living room, the bedroom and the kitchen. The kitchen was generally the point of entry into the house where the food was cooked on a cooker with a stone chimney. The mono-pitched roof houses were not used as dwellings. The rooms were made of sugarcane and the spaces were filled with straw, bracken, waste wood or small stones, and then lined with lime and cement. The floor was of packed-mud.

 

"Salão" House © Virgílio Gomes

 

ARCHAEOLOGICAL MARINE SITES

There are some archaeological marine sites worthy of note, such as the case of the Dutch Galleon “Slot Ter Hooge” which was shipwrecked in Porto Santo in 1724, on the north coast of the island. It was a ship that belonged to the Dutch India Company and was destined for India, to establish trade relations.

 

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